How healthy are almonds for the planet?

24.10

Land use

m²*year/kg
133.01

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
2.88

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy are almonds for the planet?

611 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
53.020 mg Fat
/100g
5.678 mg Sugar
/100g
almonds on white background.

How healthy is rice for the planet?

3.3

Land use

m²*year/kg
19.27

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
2.87

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy is rice for the planet?

355 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
620 mg Fat
/100g
306 mg Sugar
/100g
Pile of jasmine rice on white

How healthy are apples for the planet?

0.45

Land use

m²*year/kg
0.83

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
0.55

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy are apples for the planet?

65 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
49 mg Fat
/100g
10.311 mg/ Sugar
100g

How healthy is milk for the planet?

0.99

Land use

m²*year/kg
0.06

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
1.64

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy is milk for the planet?

65 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
3.566 mg Fat
/100g
4.700 mg Sugar
/100g
Milk bottle

How healthy is beef for the planet?

27.74

Land use

m²*year/kg
1.55

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
35.21

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy is beef for the planet?

155 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
8.580 mg Fat
/100g
0 mg Sugar
/100g
fresh raw beef steak

How healthy is tofu for the planet?

0.65

Land use

m²*year/kg
0.46

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
1.19

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy is tofu for the planet?

127 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
5.630 mg Fat
/100g
0 mg Sugar
/100g

How healthy is butter for the planet?

8.5

Land use

m²*year/kg
0.48

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
13.02

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy is butter for the planet?

741 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
83.199 mg Fat
/100g
600 mg Sugar
/100g
Butter on white background

How healthy is olive oil for the planet?

11.11

Land use

m²*year/kg
64.58

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
2.47

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy is olive oil for the planet?

884 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
100.000 mg Fat
/100g
4 mg Sugar
/100g
Olive oil bottle on white background.

How healthy are grapes for the planet?

1.19

Land use

m²*year/kg
5.03

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
0.76

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy are grapes for the planet?

72 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
280 mg Fat
/100g
14.610 mg Sugar
/100g

How healthy is pork for the planet?

15.57

Land use

m²*year/kg
0.46

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
17.71

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy is pork for the planet?

217 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
16.502 mg Fat
/100g
0 mg Sugar
/100g

How healthy is poultry for the planet?

17.92

Land use

m²*year/kg
0.59

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
12.94

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy is poultry for the planet?

166 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
9.600 mg Fat
/100g
0 mg Sugar
/100g
Fresh raw chicken meat, isolated on white background

How healthy are potatoes for the planet?

0.29

Land use

m²*year/kg
0.14

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
0.33

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy are potatoes for the planet?

76 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
14 mg Fat
/100g
702 mg Sugar
/100g

How healthy are bananas for the planet?

0.37

Land use

m²*year/kg
0.21

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
0.84

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy are bananas for the planet?

93 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
180 mg Fat
/100g
17.268 mg Sugar
/100g
Bananas on white background

How healthy are tomatoes for the planet?

0.12

Land use

m²*year/kg
1.2

Water scarcity

m³ world equivalents/kg
0.4

Greenhouse gas emissions, incl. land-use change and forestry

kg CO2e/kg

How healthy are tomatoes for the planet?

20 kcal Energy from dietary fibre
/100g
210 mg Fat
/100g
2.520 mg Sugar
/100g
Tomatoes on the Vine
almonds on white background.
Pile of jasmine rice on white
Milk bottle
fresh raw beef steak
Butter on white background
Olive oil bottle on white background.
Fresh raw chicken meat, isolated on white background
Bananas on white background
Tomatoes on the Vine

I'm shopping in

Why we do what we do?

Today’s food production is contributing to the destruction of our planet. Therefore, this project aims to provide relevant information on the impacts of food, such as CO2 emissions, biodiversity, land and water consumption, as well as  social impacts in order to change the way we treat our environment.

What is happening here?

Based on life cycle assessment data, we scientifically measure the environmental impact of individual products. The project will use the data to develop a tool to make the results visible and comparable for consumers and companies.

Who benefits?

The quick answer? Everyone. In greater detail: Consumers who long for conscious grocery shopping or companies that want to produce or offer more sustainable products. This helps to lower the impacts of food at a / on a local and global level.

What is Impacts of Food?

An approach to offer more sustainable products and to be able to buy more consciously. The world needs an easy and accessible way to look at the environmental impacts of individual products.

Partner countries

Germany

More and more people in Germany are asking about the consequences of their grocery shopping. By enabling consumers to make more sustainable purchases, the German federal government implements further steps in its climate protection plan.

grocery store parauay

Paraguay

Agriculture in Paraguay suffers from an accelerating climate change and at the same time contributes to it through unsustainable production. To counteract this trend, companies need information about the consequences of their production.

woman in grocery store

South Africa

Scarce water supply and unsustainable dietary trends are major challenges in South Africa. To act sustainably is thus becoming increasingly important for companies and consumers.

Thailand

The agricultural boom has led to destroyed forests and caused greenhouse gases to multiply. That is why the project supports companies in offering more sustainable products.

Curious?

Do you have any questions or suggestions of your own? Then be our guest. Share your ideas with us to help this project reach its goal. Let’s get to know each other.

What our partners say

Our consumption has to stop ignoring planetary boundaries. Systematic change is absolutely essential. This project will help to accelerate this process.

Victoria Müller, WWF

“Our food consumption is a core element in implementing sustainable development. With this project, we can refine our approach towards more sustainability.”

Dr. Ulrike Eberle, CEO corsus

“The need for radical transformation of current food systems is inescapable if the world is to achieve the sustainability and climate goals. A profound understanding of the complexity of systemic issues is fundamental to design and implement sustainable, just, and nutritious food systems.”

Olivia Riemer, Project Coordinator TMG

“Food systems are not only a problem but also a solution for our global sustainability and climate goals. What we need and aim for in the project is to understand what a transformation of food systems entails and how transformative pathways towards sustainability can be designed.”

Sarah Zitterbarth, Junior Research Associate TMG

FAQ

Consumers can reduce the environmental impacts of their food consumption just by buying more sustainable products. But to do so, they need appropriate information about products. Right now this information is either missing or communicated through labels which are too difficult to understand.

The project wants to close the information gap for consumers and businesses about environmental impacts of food and enable them to make more sustainable choices.

The project is coordinated by WWF Germany and implemented with our two partners “corsus – corporate sustainability GmbH” and “TMG Research gGmbH “.

The project is part of the International Climate Initiative (IKI), funded by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Nuclear Safety and Consumer Protection (BMUV).

Today’s industrial agriculture has a multitude of negative impacts on our planet. Those related to our current food systems and eating habits – from farm to fork – are often underestimated, even though they represent one of the greatest challenges to our planet and humanity’s continued existence on Earth. Whether it’s land-use change destroying pristine nature, soils, water and biodiversity suffering from excessive use of fertilizers and pesticides, or farmers not making enough money for the crops they produce – these are all parts causing food impacts. Learn more here.

Our eating habits are highly relevant to the planet. Industrial agriculture is leading to a significant overshoot of planetary boundaries. Planetary boundaries are the ecological limits of the Earth. Exceeding those limits threatens the stability of global ecosystems and thus the livelihoods of us all. Four of the nine limits of planetary ecosystems have already been exceeded: climate change, biodiversity loss, land use change, and phosphorus and nitrogen cycles. All of the transgressions, especially the last two, are to a significant degree due to agricultural respectively food systems. Learn more here.

Germany
The subject of sustainable consumption is becoming increasingly important throughout the country. More and more people are asking about the environmental impacts of their food. A fundamental diet change is needed to further pave the way for implementations of the German government’s climate protection plan. The project provides comprehensive information for consumers who want to shop more sustainably and supports companies with their product analysis.

Paraguay
To maintain global export demands for foods such as soy and beef, their growing agricultural sector is turning more and more nature into farmland. The consequences are rising greenhouse gases, excessive heat and drought, extreme precipitation and heavy rainfall. More sustainable alternatives for consumers have yet to be established. Therefore, the project will inform them about the environmental impacts of food to enable more sustainable purchasing.

South Africa
Water scarcity, destroyed ecosystems and widely dried-out soils pose major challenges for agriculture, also because their agricultural sector is no longer subsidized nowadays. In addition, rapid dietary change in recent years has a negative impact on the country’s environment and population. The project therefore raises awareness among companies and consumers about the environmental impacts of food.

Thailand
Thailand owes its rapid economic growth in part to agriculture. Growth that creates enormous challenges, such as the clearing of mangrove forests, forest loss, and the resulting increase in greenhouse gas emissions. The project supports existing corporate interest in establishing sustainable and low-emitting supply chains by providing information on the costs and implementation of sustainable business practices.